uncontested divorce

What can I do if I want an uncontested divorce in Texas but can’t find my spouse?

Sometimes a married couple in Texas will decide to separate and eventually lose contact with each other. At some point one spouse decides he or she needs an uncontested divorce and not to fight over the terms of the divorce. The non-filing spouse has a right of due process under the federal and Texas constitutions to

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Fort Worth Uncontested Divorce and Prioritizing the Children

Uncontested divorce typically means the spouses agreed to the issues in the divorce rather than have the court decide how to divide property and how to address child issues–custody and child support. In the uncontested divorce the spouses have made decisions about the co-parenting relationship after the divorce. It can be easy in an uncontested divorce to

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Divorce attorney on real estate in an agreed divorce

Agreed divorces, often called uncontested divorces or no contest divorces, are divorces in which the parties have agreed to the major terms of the divorce. One of the major terms in many divorces is how to deal with the real estate owned between the spouses. In Texas approximately two-thirds of the population owns the home

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Is a contested divorce better than an uncontested divorce in Fort Worth or Dallas, Texas?

An uncontested divorce or no contest divorce in Texas is a divorce in which both spouses have agreed to the divorce and all the terms of the divorce, including property division and child issues. The Texas Family Code does not treat a contested divorce differently from an uncontested divorce or no contest divorce. (These mean

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10 Issues That Will Make Your Texas Divorce More Expensive

Divorce attorneys like myself help clients with divorces and post-divorce actions like enforcement, contempt and modification primarily in Texas. In such a large metropolitan area my clients range in family size, financial assets, post-divorce needs, property ownership and other issues related to their divorce. These divorces can range for very reasonable for clients, particularly with

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Creative Custody and Possession Schedules in a Texas Divorce

A few months ago I wrote a post about problems with 50/50 custody arrangements. Generally, the problems I discussed are relevant to any kind of custom or creative custody arrangement deviating from the standard possession order or extended standard possession order schedule found in the Texas Family Code. 50/50 custody arrangements are not the only type

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What it takes to get an uncontested divorce on your own in Texas

Last Wednesday I was at the Dallas County Family Courts helping a client wrap up an uncontested divorce. The early morning court sessions are typically open to what are called “prove ups” in which parties present testimony on uncontested issues (such as name changes, uncontested divorce decree signing, etc.) and the judge grants the orders

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7 Surprising Reasons Why You Might Want a Lawyer for your Uncontested Divorce

I’m going to tell you something many people would find shocking. Although I offer uncontested divorces in Dallas and Fort Worth, I don’t believe everybody needs a lawyer for uncontested divorce. Seriously. You can get an uncontested divorce in Texas without a divorce lawyer. People do it every day. There are basic forms available online that

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Is it better to get an uncontested divorce or fight for what you deserve?

Uncontested divorce participants comment after the fact that they liked the idea of an uncontested divorce; but along the way there were some tense discussions that made them feel like because they chose an uncontested divorce they were stuck giving in to whatever demands their spouse wanted to prevent the divorce from becoming contested. Often

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Earning the Q in your QDRO

In a Texas divorce, one of the major assets to address in a property division include retirement accounts, such as a 401k or defined benefit pension plan. Retirement assets within a private employer’s retirement plan are typically governed by ERISA. ERISA, the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, establishes particular processes for dividing assets

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Ten Common Mistakes People Make in Texas Divorces

Divorce is a time where preparation, rational thought and a willingness to make long term decisions are critical but these things can be hard to do because divorce is often also a very emotional time. Texas family law attorneys assisting clients in divorces have a responsibility to the legal interests of their client. Some attorneys take

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What is a living trust and should I have one in Texas?

Known as either a “living trust” or a “revocable living trust”, a trust is a legal creation to simply passing assets from one generation to the next without having to rely on a will and probate courts, which can be more expensive, more complex and financially disadvantageous. While there are many kinds of trusts that

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Divorce attorney explains community property rules in Texas

Texas is one of nine states in the nation that recognizes marital property as community property. Property owned in Texas by a married couple is either community property or separate property. Community property includes property owned jointly by both spouses. Separate property includes property owned by only one spouse. The law presumes all marital property is

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